substainexperiment

collective-architecture:

Cathy, Jan and Chris joined local people on Saturday 17th August for an innovative community workshop in Glasgow’s south side.  
The event was arranged in two parts: the “practical” workshop looking at a range of important day-to-day issues associated with routes through the area and the “aspirational” workshop with a “design your own garden” exercise.  
The outcome of the workshop was a series of models designed by the children: replica high rise blocks along side miniature gardens each making great use of trees, water and pathways to create wonderful spaces for the community.  These ideas are being taken forward to the next stage of design; with plans for improved green spaces linked to parkland nearby and creating a focus for the community with a new village green centred around the local train station.
collective-architecture:

Cathy, Jan and Chris joined local people on Saturday 17th August for an innovative community workshop in Glasgow’s south side.  
The event was arranged in two parts: the “practical” workshop looking at a range of important day-to-day issues associated with routes through the area and the “aspirational” workshop with a “design your own garden” exercise.  
The outcome of the workshop was a series of models designed by the children: replica high rise blocks along side miniature gardens each making great use of trees, water and pathways to create wonderful spaces for the community.  These ideas are being taken forward to the next stage of design; with plans for improved green spaces linked to parkland nearby and creating a focus for the community with a new village green centred around the local train station.

collective-architecture:

Cathy, Jan and Chris joined local people on Saturday 17th August for an innovative community workshop in Glasgow’s south side.  

The event was arranged in two parts: the “practical” workshop looking at a range of important day-to-day issues associated with routes through the area and the “aspirational” workshop with a “design your own garden” exercise.  

The outcome of the workshop was a series of models designed by the children: replica high rise blocks along side miniature gardens each making great use of trees, water and pathways to create wonderful spaces for the community.  These ideas are being taken forward to the next stage of design; with plans for improved green spaces linked to parkland nearby and creating a focus for the community with a new village green centred around the local train station.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.


urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco


Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.

The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 

Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.

urbangeographies:

Rethinking “parklets” in San Francisco

Since beginning to allow local businesses and community groups to create “parklets” in 2009, San Francisco has pioneered these streetside public spaces in what the city initially called the ”temporary urbanism program.” SF agencies developed a program that allows businesses, nonprofits and property owners to apply for permits to convert adjacent on-street parking into public spaces that are open and accessible, though also removable.
The San Francisco Examiner and Planetizen recently reported on the removal of a parklet that had been criticized as “a haven for homelessness and illegal activity” in the Haight-Ashbury district. Observers have interpreted this episode as reflecting the “growing pains” of this conversion of on-street parking into public spaces. With about 40 parklets now scattered around the city (see photos above), and many more requests all the time, Planning Department officials are said to have learned from this incident and others around the City. 
Oversight and guidelines now require detailed descriptions of the design and purpose of parklets as part of the application process. A comprehensive packet released late last year by the Planning Department began to codify the city’s policies on this innovative experiment in the creation of small, incremental, locally created public spaces. Other cities around the country have begun to follow suit in efforts to encourage more vibrant public spaces for pedestrians and local businesses.

unconsumption:

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater: 
Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.

The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.


See more here. 
unconsumption:

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater: 
Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.

The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.


See more here. 
unconsumption:

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater: 
Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.

The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.


See more here. 
unconsumption:

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater: 
Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.

The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.


See more here. 

unconsumption:

junkculture:

A House Built from Salvaged Materials Physically Transforms into an Open Air Theater:

Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York, Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public.
The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.
See more here